Machine learning for making machines: Applying visual search to mechanical parts

Computer vision researchers use machine learning to train computers in visually recognizing objects—but very few apply machine learning to mechanical parts such as gearboxes, bearings, brakes, clutches, motors, nuts, bolts and washers.

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AI tool can distinguish between a conspiracy theory and a true conspiracy

The audio on the otherwise shaky body camera footage is unusually clear. As police officers search a handcuffed man who moments before had fired a shot inside a pizza parlor, an officer asks him why he was there. The man says to investigate a pedophile ring. Incredulous, the officer asks again. Another officer chimes in, “Pizzagate. He’s talking about Pizzagate.”

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System brings deep learning to Internet of Things devices

Deep learning is everywhere. This branch of artificial intelligence curates your social media and serves your Google search results. Soon, deep learning could also check your vitals or set your thermostat. MIT researchers have developed a system that could bring deep learning neural networks to new—and much smaller—places, like the tiny computer chips in wearable medical devices, household appliances, and the 250 billion other objects that constitute the “internet of things” (IoT).

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HAMLET: A platform to simplify AI research and development

Machine learning (ML) algorithms have proved to be highly valuable computational tools for tackling a variety of real-world problems, including image, audio and text classification tasks. Computer scientists worldwide are developing more of these algorithms every day; thus, keeping track of them and quickly finding or accessing those introduced in the past is becoming increasingly challenging.

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Scientists use artificial intelligence to forecast large-scale traffic patterns more accurately

It’s no secret that Los Angeles is notorious for its traffic jams, typically ranking first in studies of the nation’s traffic hot spots. Estimates suggest that Angelinos spend an extra 120 hours a year stuck in them. While a nightmare for drivers, the L.A. transportation system does have its advantages if you’re devising a new system to quickly predict and potentially redirect that traffic.

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New method brings physics to deep learning to better simulate turbulence

Deep learning, also called machine learning, reproduces data to model problem scenarios and offer solutions. However, some problems in physics are unknown or cannot be represented in detail mathematically on a computer. Researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign developed a new method that brings physics into the machine learning process to make better predictions.

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Researchers use dynamical systems and machine learning to add spontaneity to AI

Autonomous functions for robots, such as spontaneity, are highly sought after. Many control mechanisms for autonomous robots are inspired by the functions of animals, including humans. Roboticists often design robot behaviors using predefined modules and control methodologies, which makes them task-specific, limiting their flexibility. Researchers offer an alternative machine learning-based method for designing spontaneous behaviors by capitalizing on complex temporal patterns, like neural activities of animal brains. They hope to see their design implemented in robotic platforms to improve their autonomous capabilities.

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New technology exploits fluorescence and machine learning to speedily scan thousands of images

Any biological sample—dirt, water, or food, for example—contains billions of bacteria. Only a few are harmful to humans, or pathogenic. But those few pathogens can mean the difference between a reliable supply of meat or lettuce, for example, and an outbreak of food poisoning—or worse, a pandemic.

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