Machine learning for making machines: Applying visual search to mechanical parts

Computer vision researchers use machine learning to train computers in visually recognizing objects—but very few apply machine learning to mechanical parts such as gearboxes, bearings, brakes, clutches, motors, nuts, bolts and washers.

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via TechXplore.com

New green materials could power smart devices using ambient light

We are increasingly using more smart devices like smartphones, smart speakers, and wearable health and wellness sensors in our homes, offices, and public buildings. However, the batteries they use can deplete quickly and contain toxic and rare environmentally damaging chemicals, so researchers are looking for better ways to power the devices.

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First digital single-chip millimeter-wave beamformer will exploit 5G capabilities

The first fully integrated single-chip digital millimeter-wave (MMW) beamformer, created by electrical and computer engineers at the University of Michigan, opens up new possibilities in high-frequency 5G communications. The technology could be used to improve vehicle-to-vehicle communication, autonomous driving, satellite internet, and national defense, to name a few.

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Jet-printing complex circuits using microfluidics

Biomedical applications in life sciences can greatly benefit from microfluidics devices; however, the technology is suboptimal for rapid production and applications in biolabs. For instance, solid opaque walls of conventional microfluidic devices prevent biologists from providing adequate physical and optical access to their biological samples. Therefore, there is a growing need to engineer optimized microfluidics for efficient workflow. In a new study, Cristian Soitu and a research team at the Walsh and Cook Research Groups in the Department of Engineering Science and the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology at the University of Oxford, U.K., described a new contactless, microfluidics circuit fabrication method.

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Camel-fur-inspired power-free system harnesses insulation and evaporation to keep items cool

Camels have evolved a seemingly counterintuitive approach to keeping cool while conserving water in a scorching desert environment: They have a thick coat of insulating fur. Applying essentially the same approach, researchers at MIT have now developed a system that could help keep things like pharmaceuticals or fresh produce cool in hot environments, without the need for a power supply.

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